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  #46  
Old 07-06-2010, 05:23 AM
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Why aren't the dark parts of the phases of the moon red? Why are they black like sin?

I shall try because I am terribly bored at the moment and am in need of intellectual stimulation.

It's like this. First of all, you are in need of information. Everything I am stating has been simplified.

Visible light has a wavelength range of around, to make it simple, 400 nanometers (nm), from 400 nm with violet light to 800 nm with red light.

Now, you have to understand, first of all, that all objects emit radiation. It's just what they do. They emit radiation. Depending on the temperature of the object, it will emit different radiation. We, relatively cold bodies on an astronomical scale, at only around 38 C, emit infrared light. A cold star will emit red light. A hotter star will emit white light. An even hotter star will emit ultraviolet light (the hottest stars). Matter falling into a black hole and being heated to tremendous temperatures will be heated to x-ray light.

Now, we only see light when it is reflected by an object or if we look at the source of the light. Take a laser, for example. You cannot see the laser beam as it passes though the air, only from the hole in the laser pointer and the point on the wall. You can see it reflect off dust in the air, but you cannot see the laser beam in the air itself. Now, there is a theoretical object called a black body. This object only emits radiation and absorbs all radiation that falls upon it. This is just a fancy and scientific way of stating that this object only emits light, more importantly, only emits light of a certain wavelength at a certain temperature. This means that at 0 K, it is black. It emits no light. A mirror at 0 K would not be black, it would reflect light, as an example (assuming it would remain at 0 k with light reflecting off it, which it would not). So we establish all objects emit light at a certain temperature as well as reflect light.

The sun also emits light at a certain temperature. The temperature of the surface of the sun is around 6000 K.



Now, this is a graph for black body radiation. An object at 3000 K would emit that lowest function. An object at 4000 K would emit that middle function. And an object at 5000 K would emit that highest function. The sun is around 6000 K or thereabouts, slightly more, which makes the most common emitted frequency by the sun green. Green. The sun is not yellow, it is green.

The thing is that even though the sun's light emitted peaks at green, we don't see it as green because it, amazingly, emits other colors as well, and very brightly I might add, which is called irradiance. So, if you had a red flashlight at, say, 1, a green flashlight at 10, and a blue flashlight at 1, the light you would see when they reflected off a white reflective surface would be mostly green. The thing is that the sun is quite hot, and ergo emits a lot (a lot is a lot) of radiation, so, the sun then emits, on the contrary to the flashlight, 9991999 red, another at 9999999 green, and another at 9991999 blue (pulling numbers out of my ass here), and so you wouldn't see green but white because all the colors are mixing. This is why snow is white. This is why clouds are white. (NOTE; very very simplified explanation).

So, we have established that the sun is white (or green, but not yellow).

Now, on to red shift. The misnomer is the "red" in that name. If the name of it was simply "Doppler effect v2.0" or "lower frequency shift" then you wouldn't think that the "red" was literally red. All the red shift states is that when an object is traveling away from you and light, reflected or emitted, from this object travels from this object to you, while the object is traveling away from you, that the frequency of light from this object lowers (or the wavelength increases) the faster that this object travels away from you. So, you and the object are still relative to one another. So, 1λ = 1λ. If the object is traveling away from you, then, for example, 1λ = 0.9λ. If the object is traveling toward you, then the frequency is increased, and this is called the blue shift. So, 1λ = 1.1λ. λ is wavelength but it is more pretty than Hz and it's the same shit anyway.

The thing is that most of the light in the universe is not the red color (or frequency/wavelength) of the visible spectrum, but microwave, and this is called Cosmic Background Radiation. Now, are the neighboring stars to the sun emitting light at a high enough temperature and redshifting to the point where their frequencies are lowered to be red colored and therefore are coloring the moon red? The answer...is no.

So, those are two things that are settled.

Now, what does cause the moon to be red during a lunar eclipse? There are certain things that must be understood, namely the distance from the sun to the earth, the distance from the earth to the moon, the distance from the sun to the moon, the size of the moon, and the size of the shadow of the earth.

I'm getting bored actually, and so I shall wrap this up succinctly. The edge of a shadow. When you're close to what you are putting the shadow on, the shadow edge is sharp. When you are far away, the edge is fuzzy. This is because of the scattering of the light through matter. Molecules do that to light. Meaning that the further away, the more fuzzy it becomes, the more light goes around this shadow. The moon is a fucking fuckload far away from Earth, and the Earth has at atmosphere. This means that, while a plane flying in the umbra of the earth will not get light, and an artifical satellite will not get light, the moon, which is far away from earth, will get a twilight of sorts. The preumbra, where you would assume where the twilight should be, is almost as bright as normal because, as I have stated before, the sun emits a ridiculous amount of light. I assume you have heard about not staring at the sun during a partial eclipse. Well, there you go. Also, do not forget that the earth is rotating, and the earth is moving, not only the moon. Along with clouds, dust in the atmosphere, and whatnotmore, these all have effects on a lunar eclipse.



Do you think that the shadow of the earth takes up that much of the sky?

Anyway, read this: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3077347/

Quote:
Originally Posted by PoseidonsNet
my theory is just that the red of the moon
is the ambient color of the universe minus the sun
Your HYPOTHESIS.

So, why aren't the dark parts of the phases of the moon red? Explain that to me.
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  #47  
Old 07-06-2010, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PoseidonsNet View Post
my theory is just that the red of the moon
is the ambient color of the universe minus the sun

it just so happens that the red shift caused by the expanding universe
means that the vast majority of light reaching us

is

RED

;-j
So when I look up at night the sky should be RED?

FAIL
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  #48  
Old 07-06-2010, 07:02 PM
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PoseidonsNet PoseidonsNet is offline
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Cat, most of what you say is off-topic. However,
The sun is not green.
Its a type G star.

Do you know what a type G star is, and why the sun is called a type G star?

let me answer for you.
Because its yellow. (mostly).

The definition of a type G star is that its yellow (mostly). Not green.
Yellow.
Are you color blind perhaps?

Now you claim the sun is green. ok!
That is in contradiction to the given theory which claims the sun is white!!!!!!!!!
So you at least have tacitly agreed that the given theory has a
FALSE PREMISE!

You ask why the dark spots are not red.
Look again at your photo.

They are red!
dark red.

When you place a dark object in a red light it goes dark red.
The darker it is, the darker it is, regardless of the color of the light its in.

~~~

Gort.
You have not read the thread, otherwise you would know this is my explanation



Simply put,
A large object reflects a large amount of light.

The red light normally is there, but its in small amounts.
It has been detected and is called the red shift.

When the sun's light is not there to overpower it,
then the large size and the shape of the moon focus the light at us.

Its the same reason its easier to see a big object rather than a small object.
because.....
Big objects reflect more light than small ones do.

The going theory claims there IS a red light coming from the atmosphere,
which you correctly state
is
JUST NOT THERE

once more you all disagree with me whilst
proving the given theory is based on many false premises.

Now I forgive the 19th century bloke who had this idea,
he had never heard of the red shift.
He did not KNOW that the sun is a

TYPE G STAR

WHICH MEANS ITS YELLOW


NOT WHITE OR >symptom 777 quote here< GREEN

~~~

Another point.
The light from each star diminishes to the power 2 with further distance,
while the number of stars increases to the power 3 with greater volume.

X^3 / X^2 = X

thats a perfect straight line graph showing that the amount of red light
increases with the volume of space taken into account.

a perfect straight line graph
the essence of categorical science

~~~
whats next,
is someone going to insist that the sun is actually PINK?

;-j
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  #49  
Old 07-06-2010, 08:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PoseidonsNet
Cat, most of what you say is off-topic.
It was not off-topic. Everything is related.
Quote:
The sun is not green.
Its a type G star.

Do you know what a type G star is, and why the sun is called a type G star?

let me answer for you.
Because its yellow. (mostly).

The definition of a type G star is that its yellow (mostly). Not green.
Yellow.
Are you color blind perhaps?

Now you claim the sun is green. ok!
That is in contradiction to the given theory which claims the sun is white!!!!!!!!!
So you at least have tacitly agreed that the given theory has a
FALSE PREMISE!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yawn_God
The thing is that even though the sun's light emitted peaks at green, we don't see it as green because it, amazingly, emits other colors as well, and very brightly I might add, which is called irradiance. So, if you had a red flashlight at, say, 1, a green flashlight at 10, and a blue flashlight at 1, the light you would see when they reflected off a white reflective surface would be mostly green. The thing is that the sun is quite hot, and ergo emits a lot (a lot is a lot) of radiation, so, the sun then emits, on the contrary to the flashlight, 9991999 red, another at 9999999 green, and another at 9991999 blue (pulling numbers out of my ass here), and so you wouldn't see green but white because all the colors are mixing. This is why snow is white. This is why clouds are white. (NOTE; very very simplified explanation).
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoseidonsNet
You ask why the dark spots are not red.
Look again at your photo.

They are red!
dark red.

When you place a dark object in a red light it goes dark red.
The darker it is, the darker it is, regardless of the color of the light its in.
I asked regarding the phases of the moon, not during a lunar eclipse.

Why isn't this red?

Quote:
Originally Posted by PoseidonsNet
The red light normally is there, but its in small amounts.
It has been detected and is called the red shift.
I have already explained what the red shift is. Why you think it is some sort of detection of radiation that is around 480405 THz is beyond me.

Quote:
The going theory claims there IS a red light coming from the atmosphere,
which you correctly state
is
JUST NOT THERE


Now, as you can see, during a solar eclipse bits of the sun's light manage to skirt past the moon because its surface is irregular. It has no atmosphere, so the light passing the moon is not scattered.



This is a "solar eclipse" of Saturn. As you can see, light is passing by at the edge of the atmosphere and you can see a bright ring around the planet. That light in the atmosphere, at the...well, I forgot the technical term for that edge of darkness that forms a circle around the planet, but the point is that when behind the planet, the light that passes though the atmosphere, the light that creates this ring, and the light that illuminates you behind the planet, assuming we're talking about the Earth and Moon here, would be red, like this:



or this


The Earth's umbra is not devoid of light from the sun, only devoid of direct light from the sun, unlike the penumbra, which has direct sunlight.

The result is this:



And this is why the moon appears red.
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  #50  
Old 07-11-2010, 08:33 PM
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Quote:
I have already explained what the red shift is. Why you think it is some sort of detection of radiation that is around 480–405 THz is beyond me.
i say nothing of detection or radiation,

whatever light that is shifted, will be slightly redder depending on
how old that light is,

so even blue goes towards the centre and gets greener, not redder,
but its wavelength gets longer, in most cases most of it ends up red,
the exact wavelength will vary in each situation...
so its not important

except that the sum total of all the light in the universe is reddish

~~

the eclipse of the sun differs from then moon
because the earth's shadow is much much much much much much
larger than the moon's,
so any part of the sun's corona will be blocked out by the sheer SIZE of the earth,

you can post as many red sunsets as you like,
for each red sunset

there are 100 sunsets that have no red in them at all,
and there are no sunsets as seen from space that are red either

i need no photo to back up what i've seen
and you have seen
thousands of times

~~~

would you please explain how the mondern astronomy of star types
fits into YOUR theory of how the sun is green,

are all type G stars actually green?
what color are type A stars, in reality?

what color are blue-yellow pairs of stars like Albireo,
REALLY?

pink and purple?

why do you keep avoiding how your theory is in
total contradiction to how astronomy categorizes stars according to their color?

.... type G = yellow

~~

.... still no red coming from the atmosphere when we look from space,
just the occasional red sunset which stands out
purely because

its actually

quite

rare

and
not the norm at all

;-j
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  #51  
Old 07-12-2010, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PoseidonsNet
except that the sum total of all the light in the universe is reddish
No.

Quote:
what color are blue-yellow pairs of stars like Albireo,
REALLY?

pink and purple?
Pink and purple are non-spectral colors. They cannot be produced by thermal radiation.

Quote:
why do you keep avoiding how your theory is in
total contradiction to how astronomy categorizes stars according to their color?
Because color is a misnomer. I'm saying the sun peaks at green frequencies. It is still a G type star because of absorption lines, solar mass, etc. Stars between 5300 K and 6000 K with ~+/- 1 solar mass are all G type stars, yet between those temperatures the peak emitted radiations are different.

I can't help you any further.

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  #52  
Old 07-18-2010, 03:46 PM
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you speak kak

pink is red and white light together
purple is a mixture of extreme red and extreme blue,

red and blue and white ARE thermal colors

answer please
a type G star is :

A) Yellow
B) Green
C) White
D) Pink
E) Purple
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  #53  
Old 07-18-2010, 03:50 PM
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ALL the colors are from the spectrum!
thats why its called the VISIBLE SPECTRUM
because the colors in that spectrum are visible!

and the ambient color of the universe is RED
because most objects exhibit a red shift
because they are receding from us at greater speeds the further away they are

thats why its called the RED shift
and not the GREEN shift or BLUE shift or PINK AND PURPLE shift

capisce?
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